install theme

futurejournalismproject:

Cable on Climate Science

Via the Union of Concerned Scientists:

CNN, Fox News, and MSNBC are the most widely watched cable news networks in the U.S. Their coverage of climate change is an influential source of information for the public and policy makers alike.

To gauge how accurately these networks inform their audiences about climate change, UCS analyzed the networks’ climate science coverage in 2013 and found that each network treated climate science very differently.

Fox News was the least accurate; 72 percent of its 2013 climate science-related segments contained misleading statements. CNN was in the middle, with about a third of segments featuring misleading statements. MSNBC was the most accurate, with only eight percent of segments containing misleading statements.

Read the overview here, or jump to the study here (PDF).

Images: Science or Spin?: Assessing the Accuracy of Cable News Coverage of Climate Science, via Union of Concerned Scientists

, #science #resources #sources #news #news sources #humanactions #climate science #science journalism

STEM contributors who aren't White and male.

christel-thoughts:


You may have noticed that i reblog STEM posts somewhat often, but I find that the mainstream science and math blogs have a tendency to ignore the contributions of women or people of color (with the exception of Neil deGrasse Tyson). Sometimes it’s under the banner of “historical contributions” that ignore the historical practice of only acknowledging what is written by certain groups or in the language accepted by certain groups (largely because it’s the only language they understand) as well as the age-old practice of theft.

so… every now and then i get annoyed enough to do some quick searching and create a post acknowledging the work of people of color (and the list MUST include women) in science, technology, engineering, and math whether historical or current.

Here is such a list “The 50 Most Important Blacks in Research Science”, from 2004, published by Black Engineer Magazine (pdf) (html). The Mathematicians of the African Diaspora page contains links for most of these scientists if you are interested (x).

In my search, i also found a page by the University of Pennsylvania, titled “Pioneer African American Mathematicians”, about American Black mathematicians who studied at UPenn (x).

One thing I find somewhat disturbing is how often our contributions are limited to being the first to be admitted, allowed to graduate, or finally promoted to a position we earned. Rarely do we find where we are credited with creating something theoretical, which seems to be the requirement for being included on many of these “best of” or “world-changing” lists created and promoted by mainstream STEM blogs.

I find that when you get into the contributions of POC and women, we are often more likely to be credited with having been integral in something on the applied side or with creating the very foundation for which theories are built. But… for whatever reason(s) (ahem, the white supremacy myth and sexism), those are never considered world-changing or important enough to be a required and tested part of the common curriculum. We don’t teach names and cultures at the elementary and secondary educational levels until the recognizable entries into the field become backed by white faces. You have to pay for specialty undergraduate or graduate courses to learn that POC and women were heavily instrumental in building these fields into what they are… after 20+ years of whitewashing and the exclusion of women.

In the search today, i came across some of the work of Beatrice Lumpkin, an activist and former educator of mathematics at the community college level. She penned a thesis of sorts for the Portland Public School system titled “African and African-American Contributions to Mathematics”  (x) that provides some important foundation I didn’t have the pleasure of learning until i took a History of Mathematics class at the college level (a course that still glossed over or simply skipped the contributions of Blacks as much as possible). She also uses this to mention the creation of a relatively new field called ethnomathematics which led me to a publication from 1997 “Ethnomathematics: Challenging Eurocentrism in Mathematics Education (Suny Series, Reform in Mathematics Education)”   with editors Arthur B. Powell and Marilyn Frankenstein  and 2010’s “The Crest of the Peacock: Non-European Roots of Mathematics (Third Edition)” by George Gheverghese Joseph. Both are available on Amazon.com for under $30 and definitely on my reading list now because this isn’t about being PC or even “just” about diversity.

This is about telling the truth when it comes to science, technology, engineering, and math… and the way we have determined what, in supposedly objective fields, has been critical to their advancement by purely subjective racist+sexist means.

, #STEM #resources #mathematics #social consciousness #humanactions
knightofash:
Could you recommend some good cell/genetic biology books to read to get a general handle on the topic? I'm well read in engineering and physics but pretty lacking when it comes to biology. My grandfather was a microbiologist for a few decades and listening to his stories made me interested in cells and the like.

science-junkie:

image

Bookshelf: Part One
Biology & Genetics

First of all, you might want to have a look at some textbook, such as:
Biology by Campbell & Reece.
Molecular Biology of the Cell by Bruce Alberts, etc.
Concepts of Genetics by William S. Klug etc. …

Then you can move more easily through popular science. My favourite books (in English) on genetics/biology are

DNA: The Secret of Life by James D. Watson.
The Selfish Gene by Richard Dawkins.
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot
The Violinist’s Thumb by Sam Kean.
The Snoring Bird by Bernd Heinrich.

The Snoring Bird is not entirely related to the topics you specified, but I love this book (I am particularly interested in the ideological clash between “modern” biologists vs.“old-fashioned” naturalists) and when you have mentioned your grandfather, you have reminded me of it.

It goes without saying (… or not) that you can’t delve into all this without knowing the theory of evolution, it’s like trying to build a skyscraper without foundation or scaffolding.

, #biology #books #resources

thenewenlightenmentage:

Best of 2013!

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

, #astronomyfacts #news #space #science #resource #resources #articles

Science jobs that aren't research benchwork, the incomplete list

femscinerd:

Science Writing
Scientific Journal Editor
Science Policy
Science Outreach
Science Education for Non-scientists
Teacher (high school, community/technical college, small liberal arts colleges)
Non-tenured Faculty (often involves managing multiple projects, more administrative work)
Science Program Administration (such as program recruitment, program design, providing student & career support services)
Facility Director (i.e. microscopy, flow cytometry, animal model development, sequencing, mass spectrometry, cell line development, etc centers to support university scientists)
Public Health Program Analyst
Biostatistician 
Patent Agent/Attorney
Industry Project Manager
Lab Manager
Research Center Director (i.e., managing multiple Principle Investigators and scientists with a common goal of developing therapies for a particular disease)
Clinical Diagnostician
Clinical Trials Manager/Coordinator
Medical Science Liaison
Product Sales Representative
Product Marketing
Quality Control Specialist
Regulatory Affairs Specialist (i.e. working to get new drugs approved for a company)
Regulatory Enforcement (i.e. working for the FDA for drug approval, analyzing food quality, evaluating livestock health)
Technical Support Specialist (for laboratory products)
Investment Analyst (into biotech companies)
Entrepreneur (starting your own company around a product/invention)
Medical/Science Ethicist (such as for IRB or IACUC boards)

Further information/resources
myIDP: To explore career options based on your interests and skills. Highly recommended for grad students.
Science Careers: From the publishers of Science, dedicated to all things related to building a career in science
Naturejobs Career toolkit: Advice on CVs/resumes, interviews, networking, career advancement and options

This is a great list to start with. Definitely worth looking into for those who are interested in working in science/STEM but are on-the-fence, or just don’t know what’s out there. Hopefully some of you find this useful or can even add a few things to it!

, #career #resources #stem #science #humanactions

FutureLearn: Free Online Courses

Free online courses from a variety of universities and other institutions.

I don’t think anyone has suggested this fantastic site as of yet, so thank you very much, populex, for the great submission! The courses offered here look very interesting, covering a range of multiple topics spreading into a plethora of differing fields, which include five featured courses which are Sustainability, Intro to Forensic Science, Critical Listening for Studio Production, Climate Change: Challenges & Solutions, and Shakespeare’s Hamlet: Text, Performance, & Culture. View a complete list courses offered currently here

, #submission #resources #resource #free online courses #free courses #online courses #education #forensic science #sustainability #shakespeare #climate change
cosmophilia:

"In the age of information, ignorance is a choice." - Donnie Miller
There is overwhelming evidence for the theory of evolution, Those who wish to find this evidence need only an open mind and the desire to learn, as the evidence is not at all kept in hiding. Below are a few credible sources for those who are curious about what evolution is and the supporting evidence for the theory. Please add to this list as you see fit.
UCA Berkeley’s one-stop source for information on evolution
Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History’s webpage of evidence and information on human evolution
National Academy of Sciences E-Book “Science and Creationism”

cosmophilia:

"In the age of information, ignorance is a choice." - Donnie Miller

There is overwhelming evidence for the theory of evolution, Those who wish to find this evidence need only an open mind and the desire to learn, as the evidence is not at all kept in hiding. Below are a few credible sources for those who are curious about what evolution is and the supporting evidence for the theory. Please add to this list as you see fit.

, #evolution #education #humanactions #science #Resources
pennyfournasa:


This week is Open Access Week. Open Access is the free, immediate, online access to the results of scholarly research. Typically resulting scholarly articles are only available through an expensive journal and research data isn’t openly shared. Movements calling for public access to these articles and for open data are gaining traction and momentum.
NASA has a strong track record of archiving and providing universal access to scientific data that result from its mission and programs. NASA makes datasets, tools, widgets, and catalogs openly available on data.gov (http://1.usa.gov/HiJrtn). Some of NASA’s data products include the NASA World Wind and Planetary Data System. NASA World Wind is a web service and open source project that allows people to zoom from satellite altitude into any place on Earth.  The Planetary Data System (PDS), which was originally developed in the 1990s, provides access to data from more than 50 years of missions.
However, NASA hasn’t been perfect in its openness. The first series of papers based on data from the Mars Curiosity rover were published in Science, a prestigious and expensive subscription journal, and were not made openly accessible to the public. Biologist and Open Access advocate Michael Eisen recently called NASA out on this and “set free” the articles by posting them on his blog. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory has now posted openly accessible links to these articles on its website.
If you want NASA to continue its important research and gather more data about Earth and space, then ask Congress to give a Penny4NASA.
Learn more about NASA and open data access.
Learn more about Open Access. 
View a quick video from PhDComics explaining Open Access.

pennyfournasa:

This week is Open Access Week. Open Access is the free, immediate, online access to the results of scholarly research. Typically resulting scholarly articles are only available through an expensive journal and research data isn’t openly shared. Movements calling for public access to these articles and for open data are gaining traction and momentum.

NASA has a strong track record of archiving and providing universal access to scientific data that result from its mission and programs. NASA makes datasets, tools, widgets, and catalogs openly available on data.gov (http://1.usa.gov/HiJrtn). Some of NASA’s data products include the NASA World Wind and Planetary Data System. NASA World Wind is a web service and open source project that allows people to zoom from satellite altitude into any place on Earth.  The Planetary Data System (PDS), which was originally developed in the 1990s, provides access to data from more than 50 years of missions.

However, NASA hasn’t been perfect in its openness. The first series of papers based on data from the Mars Curiosity rover were published in Science, a prestigious and expensive subscription journal, and were not made openly accessible to the public. Biologist and Open Access advocate Michael Eisen recently called NASA out on this and “set free” the articles by posting them on his blog. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory has now posted openly accessible links to these articles on its website.

If you want NASA to continue its important research and gather more data about Earth and space, then ask Congress to give a Penny4NASA.

Learn more about NASA and open data access.

Learn more about Open Access. 

View a quick video from PhDComics explaining Open Access.

, #open data #NASA #humanactions #science #data #news #Resources

Dark Matter in Galaxies: The Last Mystery - free online course

There is something out there in space, something invisible we have a hard time to understand. But we can be certain of one thing: It played a major role in the formation of our and any other galaxy!

Iversity is also currently offering these courses: DNA - From Structure to Therapy and The Fascination of Crystals and Symmetry.

This is absolutely wonderful, thank you for sharing this educational opportunity with all of TSR’s readers! Hopefully many of you will find this useful. If you can’t find a course concerning a specific interest of yours, make sure to check out the rest of free online courses, video lectures, and text books linked here on my extra resources page.

And as I will continue to harp with every related post, please don’t forget to find and read all Terms & Conditions for any free online courses you sign up for; most online courses will not offer transferrable/recognizable credits for accredited academic institutions [such as colleges, high schools, etc.] unless specifically stated. Enjoy the educational expansion! 

, #resources #class #education #submission #free courses #online courses #online course #normandysdeck #dark matter #DNA

The Orbitron: a gallery of atomic orbitals and molecular orbitals

atomicallena:

Orbitron is a fantastic online tool that has animated plots of wave functions and electron densities, radial distribution plots, and even has 3D representations of the 7g orbitals! Even better, it throws in a little MO Theory.

I highly recommend those who are learning about atomic structures to use it. I am currently using it for my class on s- and p-block chemistry, and as a visual learner, Orbitron is great.

I’ve added a link to Orbitron on my chemistry resources page as well.

, #atomic orbitals #orbitron #science #chemistry #tool #Resources
Anonymous:
could you perhaps link me to the post where there's a whole bunch of links to online university courses that are free? I had it in my likes on here but I can't seem to find it! sorry for bothering you but it would be a great help if you could give me a link to it, thank you!

Of course, dear! TSR actually has multiple posts concerning free online courses and self education resources, so I’ll post the links to each below for you to browse over on your own time, as I’m not completely sure which one in particular you’re referring to. 

Please, please make sure to read the terms and agreements for each and every site you use and/or sign up for, especially in case you’re looking for transferrable credits, as many of the sites courses aren’t legally credible in known educational institutions unless otherwise stated. I’ve put a warning on a few of the posts, as well as my Resources for Self Education page, which I also suggest checking out here.

You’re no bother at all, no need to apologize. I need to update my FAQs, so this happens more times than not as I’m more familiar with the whereabouts and tags of certain posts than you all. I’d rather my readers ask me for help finding something they find useful as opposed to just giving up and never finding it at all. I hope this gives you some good tools, and if you need any further help my ask is always open. Enjoy!!

, #Anonymous #Question #resources #sources #online courses #self education #education

Women in science: More suggestions for learning to code

women-in-science:

Code Academy — Online tutorials that are definitely worth checking out alongside Coursera, Udacity, and Edx.

Girl Develop It — A growing program in several cities that focuses on women!

Flatiron School, Dev Bootcamp, General Assembly — Bootcamp style designed to take you from zero to web dev in no time.

Hacker School — Expects you to have some programming experience, but not necessarily all that much. They strive for each batch to be 50% female and to have an encouraging atmosphere.

Local Python and Ruby meetups often have workshops for beginners, so those are worth checking out, too. Hopefully you have as much fun learning to code as I did!

, #coding #science #resources #resource
^